Leroy and Capella See Action

May 11, 1999

Robert Denlinger - Leroy and Capella see action

Hello Anyone listening out there. Did you remember that Triplett's Leroy is visiting for some "Adventure" training with Capella? Her Daemon Sister is taking lessons with Gerald in preparation for some sort of "Specialty" where Kuvasz BWD's are expected to walk back and forth while some humans, dressed in camouflage tuxedos, decide the merits of said large furry critters. The winner will be named the very best Kuvasz for walking around arena floors. Of course, this trophy will bring tons of money to the respective breeder for the year.

Meanwhile, back in "Working Kuvasz" territory, Capella tries to hold the fort without the proven attack capabilities of Callisto. And it was just a matter of time before the Coyote's would notice the lack of this farm's "Early Warning System".

I stayed up too late (again), this time trying to find someone to bale my alfalfa field, as it is "prime" right now. The jerk that said he was going to do same, reneged. And for the second year in a row we likely will lose that field do to person's saying they will do something and changing their minds. Isn't society great? So I was a little grumpy and tired.

I just hit the pillow (it seems) when all the canines in the world woke my up. The BC's were howling/baying, isolated in their X-Pens. I could hear Capella and Leroy barking, but it seemed too weak for the distance they were at from here. They were in the "Nets" about a half mile away, with the Ewes. The Bear was "Woofing" in various directions.

So I grabbed the "Arsenal" and my favorite, heavy, spotlight. That's the one that has a wrist cord and uses a big six-volt battery. And out into the pitch-black night I went. Well, I didn't know which way to run. Nearby, the "Baah-ing" from the Lamb barn was less than nominal even considering all those lambs had been weaned two days ago. Something was disturbing them, I reasoned.

But "way down there", I could hear Capella and her student, Leroy, raising cane. Their voices, however, didn't seem to come from where I thought the Sheep Nets were. Hummmm. Aw heck, right here, the BC's were barking and one was howling. Don't know of a three-sided coin to "Toss", so I opted for the cash crop, namely the nearby lambs.

"C'mon Bear". And we were off at a trot. The lambs were just "disturbed", so we took off for the "Ox-Trench" area, an easy half-mile over flat pasture, albeit pitch black. I don't use the spotlight for fear of A.) ruining my night-vision and B.) giving away both my "intentions" and my position. Anyway, on these night-raids, I always have had Callisto or Bear to guide me. And the Bear did a great job.

As I was about half way, only then could I resolve the locations of two coyote packs. Oh Great-Maker! The one "back-there" seemed by the Lamb-Barn. But I guessed it must have gone across the small river and into Farmer Allen's pasture. Gosh they were sure singing up an awful racket. The one in front of me was definitely at the opposite corner of the "Nets" and thus at the foot of that trench dug by oxen, 50 years ago, to help drain some of this bottom-land.

But what about the locations of the two Kuvaszok, who were supposed to be in the nets? Well, when you get closer you can tell that the original "hearing" I had done was a result of echo's of the river valley's walls, about 300 feet in height at a medium-grade slope. The pasture is a mile long, if you forgot.

So, Okay, here we are. Capella recognizes me, Leroy is uncertain, but soon figures it out when Capella "reminds" him not to lunge at "Alpha". The pleasantries done, Capella dashes back to the opposite corner of the netted off area. She and Leroy resume their severe warnings. And I can hear movement ! Bear alerts and bounces off that way. But soon Capella and Leroy are back. And Bear comes to check on me.

And then the crickets and night-birds resume the regular programming. Really! Just that fast. The "movement" I heard was just on the other side of the water from Ox-Trench. Capella and Leroy had caused the Coyote's to retreat. And maybe Bear had hastened their withdrawal.

But meanwhile, Leroy was having conniptions lunging at the beam of light made by the spotlight as it sliced through the half-foggy night air. Gosh, it was really funny. Capella just looked at him in amazement. Leroy was lunging and biting the air as the beam swept around he flock for me.

So Bear and I walked home. As I said, all was quiet now. Are you unhappy there wasn't "blood" ? Shouldn't be, I'm not. The "Natural" predators have their right to hunt. Just as Leroy and Capella have "Their" right to protect the livestock. It all balances out. This is the usual scenario. I get all geared up for combat, the LGD's run the stuff away. I go back to bed, having suffered no losses to my flock. I got the notion, walking back, to take the Laser-Light Pointer, out tonight, and sneak up on Leroy. I'll slice it through the damp air and make him think I am using a Light-Saber like Darth Vader of Star-Wars did


Robert Denlinger - May 12, 1999

Leroy and Capella again
Just in from rotating the nets. It's HOT, muggy and a herd of ten overly curious equines were attempting to assist. So if you need a "vicarious blood rush", as you put it, give up your city job for a while and come and help.

Cassiopeia and Shaanav (seen on a page on my web-site) thought that they would move the two DogLoo's to the new adjacent location. Recognizing they didn't have the opposing thumbs like I do, they decided pounding the things to death from the top would be the easiest way to assist me. Now, I'm a ways too far away, hands wrapped up in net and the short poles, to do anything to stop them. Einstein is running back and forth trying to make the flock get into a bunch, he on one side of the newly set-up nets, they on the other, blissfully munching the pittance of new grass that's grown due to drought.

Leroy is in the new nets trying to take all the various actions in, panting from the heat and unaware that a hundred feet behind him there is cool shade along the river-bank. Capella escaped by going under the electric netting, earlier this morning right after I took the two required LGD meals to them, a half mile of walking from home. This is her fourth escape in three days. So I secured her in the X-Pen (in the shade BTW) which is really where she wanted to be anyway. That older style of nets made it easy to slide under if the ground had a depression wide enough. Clever little girl she is!. But, just now, I put up the newer nets I have. She's not made it under these in the past.

What else? Leroy is doing fine. Although he routinely ignores his chow long enough for the Ewes to eat it for him. Tough Luck! I believe he's catching on. Today he snapped at the nose of one Ewe and bloodied her nose a bit. She didn't bother him again. Otherwise, Leroy has blended in well with the sheep. Whether or not he has figured out he is defending sheep or just ground, remains to be seen. So, if you want a thrill and enjoy wondering if you will make ends meet, c'mon over!

Oh, BTW, as I came in, I noticed that the remaining 5 or 7 Ewes with lambs, and about 38 already weaned lambs, had escaped too! Right now they are grazing a foaling paddock with Ruby, the Lead Broodmare, here. Splendid, just splendid. Not only with their collective little mouths trim the pasture down but I can look forwards to trying to round them up with the Border Collies. Now, trying to herd a bunch of two month old Lambs is a real circus! They may breach the perimeter, scatter everywhere or just jump in the river. Who knows.


Robert Denlinger - May 15, 1999

Kuvasz Student Opts for the Ewes

Leroy, a student of Daemon Capella, has been spending occasional time alone with the Ewes. This because Capella has been requesting to return to her X-Pen during the day for needed rest and solitude. I guess. I was using 'TensionNet" which has the lower wire a bit too high off the ground for the average clever Kuvasz. Or any LGD, for that matter.

Normally I use Electro-Net, but those sections were previously engaged holding weaned Lambs. Until this. Four days in a row, after I was returning from checking the Ewes, out in the pasture and the "Net", I noticed a fluffy white streak zinging past me gleefully. I wasn't so gleeful. Capella sure was. So I'd round her up and put her in the X-Pen. She seemed very content to sleep all day awaiting return at dusk.

Also the time I take the evening gruel to the two Kuvasz kids. Feeding has been a goat-rope. Half the time, Capella is more interested in other things than eating, thus the greedy, piggy Ewes eat her chow. I guess he's two years old, but really haven't a clue as he won't tell me. Anyway, Leroy seems happy to see me with food and sometimes snaps at the Ewes and sometimes leaves it to them. So I have been taking all the chow up and taking it back to give to any working canine here but NOT to the darned sheep.

Well, today was rotate-the-Net-Day. You know, move it over onto uneaten pasture and get off the old before it's eaten too low. Great way of wiping out weeds without chemicals. So anyway, Leroy is in the nets. I get the Ewes into a small round-pen that's easily set up and easily transported by Sherpa. That leaves Leroy in the clear, as the nets get taken down. I wanted to see what he'd decide to do, given the chance for freedom. It takes about 45 minutes, average, to strike and re-set the nets. Maybe and hour and a half if you add in other salient tasks. Anyway, I don't have a durable timepiece so the point is moot.

Well, ole Leroy wanders around, smells the river-edge a while, then makes a few expanding circles. I said "Oh Boy, here he goes ..". But he surprised me and went and laid down in the shade right next to the Ewes in their own pen. And he stayed put for, maybe, a half hour while I set the new paddock up. Then I let the Ewes into same and motioned Leroy to come in. He seems to have a problem going through "Openings", I nearly have to drag him in. But he entered with just a little coaxing. Then he checked out the new grazing area, marking appropriately here and there.

Earlier, much earlier, Rosie and Aurora were mowing a section nearby the "Old" net position. Leroy and Capella were in there at that point. The girls were at it for 3 hours continuous. And I'd say that Leroy was irate with us for he first one hour. Each time he'd sprint for the edge closest to the team, he'd bark and give the appropriate warning signals. And each time, IF we were near the net, Capella would block him and warn Leroy to get the heck away. "Thank You Capella !!". Finally, she gave up in disgust and went to the shade. Eventually, Leroy must have decided we were going to be an a periodic fixture in his domain, and he too went to the shade.

So we see here that a well-bred LGD with no prior experience doing what he was designed to do, can make good in the LGD world given a good companion-instructor. Well, so far anyway. If he'd learn to eat. I did try an experiment tonight. I took three of the sheep-panel and one four foot wide sheep-gate-panel. I enclosed the two DogLoos in same. The chain around the gate is set to allow Capella to slightly squeeze through. Which, BTW, she did do twice. I had to drag Leroy into the enclosure. There I showed him his chow was inside his DogLoo. He sniffed at it several times, but didn't reach in. At least the Ewes won't get it this way.

Capella jumped out. Leroy looked at her like she was an Olympian Goddess. I waited around, trying to coax Leroy back out. He wasn't going for the game. So I swung the gate open and he did manage to walk out on his own. Now, with the gate ajar, can he find his way back into shelter, shade, and food? It's my last stab at trying to keep the Sheep from eating inappropriate food to the detriment of the LGD's. That's it from the farm. More mowing tomorrow. More planting. More capers with Leroy and Capella.

Also the time I take the evening gruel to the two Kuvasz kids. Feeding has been a goat-rope. Half the time, Capella is more interested in other things than eating, thus the greedy, piggy Ewes eat her chow. I guess he's two years old, but really haven't a clue as he won't tell me. Anyway, Leroy seems happy to see me with food and sometimes snaps at the Ewes and sometimes leaves it to them. So I have been taking all the chow up and taking it back to give to any working canine here but NOT to the darned sheep.

Well, today was rotate-the-Net-Day. You know, move it over onto uneaten pasture and get off the old before it's eaten too low. Great way of wiping out weeds without chemicals. So anyway, Leroy is in the nets. I get the Ewes into a small round-pen that's easily set up and easily transported by Sherpa. That leaves Leroy in the clear, as the nets get taken down. I wanted to see what he'd decide to do, given the chance for freedom. It takes about 45 minutes, average, to strike and re-set the nets. Maybe and hour and a half if you add in other salient tasks. Anyway, I don't have a durable timepiece so the point is moot.

Well, ole Leroy wanders around, smells the river-edge a while, then makes a few expanding circles. I said "Oh Boy, here he goes ..". But he surprised me and went and laid down in the shade right next to the Ewes in their own pen. And he stayed put for, maybe, a half hour while I set the new paddock up. Then I let the Ewes into same and motioned Leroy to come in. He seems to have a problem going through "Openings", I nearly have to drag him in. But he entered with just a little coaxing. Then he checked out the new grazing area, marking appropriately here and there.

Earlier, much earlier, Rosie and Aurora were mowing a section nearby the "Old" net position. Leroy and Capella were in there at that point. The girls were at it for 3 hours continuous. And I'd say that Leroy was irate with us for he first one hour. Each time he'd sprint for the edge closest to the team, he'd bark and give the appropriate warning signals. And each time, IF we were near the net, Capella would block him and warn Leroy to get the heck away. "Thank You Capella !!". Finally, she gave up in disgust and went to the shade. Eventually, Leroy must have decided we were going to be an a periodic fixture in his domain, and he too went to the shade.

So we see here that a well-bred LGD with no prior experience doing what he was designed to do, can make good in the LGD world given a good companion-instructor. Well, so far anyway. If he'd learn to eat. I did try an experiment tonight. I took three of the sheep-panel and one four foot wide sheep-gate-panel. I enclosed the two DogLoos in same. The chain around the gate is set to allow Capella to slightly squeeze through. Which, BTW, she did do twice. I had to drag Leroy into the enclosure. There I showed him his chow was inside his DogLoo. He sniffed at it several times, but didn't reach in. At least the Ewes won't get it this way.

Capella jumped out. Leroy looked at her like she was an Olympian Goddess. I waited around, trying to coax Leroy back out. He wasn't going for the game. So I swung the gate open and he did manage to walk out on his own. Now, with the gate ajar, can he find his way back into shelter, shade, and food? It's my last stab at trying to keep the Sheep from eating inappropriate food to the detriment of the LGD's. That's it from the farm. More mowing tomorrow. More planting. More capers with Leroy and Capella.